Tag Archive for Matt Olson

A’s Top 10 Prospect Review with A’s Assistant General Manager Billy Owens

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A’s Assistant GM Billy Owens

Now that we’re about a third of the way into the minor league season, we wanted to step back and take a look at how all the players from our preseason Top 10 Prospect List have been performing so far this season. And there’s no one better to help us do that than A’s Assistant General Manager Billy Owens.

Owens originally joined the A’s organization back in 1999, working as an area scout and coaching short-season baseball over the next five years. He was then named the A’s Director of Player Personnel in 2004. And this past offseason, he was promoted to the position of Assistant General Manager, where the A’s are able to put his extensive knowledge of the game and its players to use in a variety of different ways.

Owens took the time to speak with us this past weekend while he was out on the road scouting prospects for next month’s amateur draft. We asked his opinion of each of the A’s top 10 prospects from our list and, as always, his enthusiasm for the A’s young players is obvious…

 

AF:  Okay, we wanted to go through our preseason Top 10 Prospect List with you and get your take on where they’re all at now that we’re about a third of the way into the minor league season at this point. So let’s start out with #1 on our list, pitcher Sean Manaea, who’s already made it to the major leagues, maybe even a little sooner than everyone expected due to all the injuries. He’s obviously a very talented young arm. Can you tell me a little bit about what you like about him and how you see his future in the major leagues shaping up?

Sean Manaea

Sean Manaea

BO:  Obviously, he’s young and it’s early in his professional career. It’s only his third full season. We made the deal last year with Ben Zobrist to acquire Manaea and he’s been super for us. He came over to Midland last year and he helped that team to a Texas League championship. He had a lights-out spring training. And with the injuries and Sean’s very good performance there in Nashville, we promoted him. He’s got really good stuff. He’s topped out at 96 mph. He throws from a slightly unusual slot that causes deception. He’s got a nice slider and a developing changeup, and he attacks the zone. It’s obviously early in his development, and there are going to be peaks and valleys, but at some point he’s going to settle in and be a really good major league starting pitcher. Physically, he reminds me of the old Pittsburgh Pirates lefty John Candelaria – he kind of throws from that same slot as the Candy Man. Sean’s going to be a really good pitcher, but it’s early and he’s young. He’s acclimated himself very well. He’s a hard-working kid, he doesn’t take himself too seriously and he takes everything in from the veterans. And it’s exciting to see what he’s done so far.

AF:  It looks like he could be more of a strikeout pitcher than Candelaria was in his heyday. He’s obviously very talented, but he’s hit a few bumps in the road early on. Is there anything in particular that he needs to do to get over the hump?

BO:  You know, they always tell you about the major leagues but, once you get there, it’s still a little bit different – it goes at a faster pace. And he obviously only had a handful of Triple-A starts. So he’s just got to fine-tune his stuff and keep on going pitch to pitch, because in the major leagues things happen quickly. So it’s nothing earth-shattering. His timetable’s just been accelerated…and at the end of the day, he’s going to be a really good major league starting pitcher.

AF:  So maybe just more of a mental adjustment for him then.

BO:  I wouldn’t even say that. I just think that the major leagues are the ultimate test. And so until you see it, until they make adjustments, until you adjust back, until you watch the video of the major league hitters, until they watch you, it’s a constant chess match. And you don’t really master that chess match until you’ve been through the wars and gone back and forth and settled in. So for a kid in his third full season, it’s a lot to ask, but he’s taken everything in his stride. He went 6 2/3 innings in his last two starts. Everything’s been positive, he’s aggressive and he’s having fun out there.

AF:  He certainly seems to have a good attitude, that’s for sure. #2 on our list is infielder Franklin Barreto. One good thing to see out of him this year is the fact that his errors in the field are certainly down from last year. He’s also been moving around, playing a little bit of second base in addition to shortstop. So how do you see his positional future shaking out and how do you view his play in the field this year?

Franklin Barreto

Franklin Barreto

BO:  I think that so far, he’s 20 years old in Double-A, he’s a really talented kid, he’s got 4 or 5 home runs already and he’s got 13 stolen bases. At the youth level, the best kid always plays shortstop. So from an athletic standpoint, he’s a talented kid. He’s almost a double-plus runner on a major league scale. He’s got power – he hit 3 home runs in major league spring training this year. Last year, he started off somewhat slowly but he finished over .300 in the California League, so offensively he’ll be fine. In Double-A, we’ve got guys like Matt Chapman and Yairo Munoz who are all capable of playing shortstop. So with all those guys on the same team, it’s been advantageous to move those guys around.

AF:  I think he’s only got about 9 or 10 walks so far this season. So would you like to see him improve his plate discipline a little bit at this point?

BO:  Yeah, but you’ve got to put it in context. He’s 20 years old in Double-A, and he’s always been a career .300 hitter and he’s an aggressive player. So we could sit here in May and talk about certain ratios, but not a lot of people have been 20 years old at Double-A putting up solid numbers. And just from development and games played, he’ll learn to tighten the strike zone and, from there, he’ll definitely flourish and be a really good player.

AF:  #3 on our list is Matt Olson. He’s been a top power-hitting prospect in the system for a few years now. But he’s struggled a bit so far this year at Nashville. I think he’s got just 3 or 4 home runs and he’s been hitting below the Mendoza Line for most of the season. So can you talk a little bit about the challenges that he’s faced adapting to Triple-A?

Matt Olson

Matt Olson

BO:  Yeah, I think we’re still very excited about Matt Olson. Triple-A is definitely a very big test, especially for a kid who’s still at a young age – 22 years old. Coming off a solid Double-A season, the first two months are definitely going to be challenging, but it’s been encouraging the last ten days or so where he’s tightening the strike zone and the walk-to-strikeout ratio is starting to pick up. You know, Double-A pitchers have really good stuff, and in Triple-A, they start being capable of really hitting their spots and pitching in sequences and really pitching to the scouting report. And then in the major leagues, they have both. So every level is a challenge as you climb the ladder. And I think Matt had to go to Triple-A to see the adjustments there that he had to be able to make. He’s a smart kid and a very talented player, and now hopefully from May going forward, he’ll continue to make those adjustments and tighten the zone. He had a really good second half last year in Midland. So this year, expect more of the same. He’ll make an adjustment from May going forward and have a really strong second half of the season.

AF:  He’s primarily been playing in right field this season. I think he’s only spent about half a dozen games at first base this year. Given that there could be an opening at that position in Oakland in the near future, do you expect him to continue getting most of his playing time in right field this season?

BO:  Yeah, I think that it increases his versatility. We’ve talked in the past about the fact that Matt’s a plus defensive first baseman, no question about it, but I also think he’s an underrated athlete. Last year, he went out to the Texas League and it was the first time that he’s really played that much outfield. And he had a ton of assists – he was among the league leaders in assists from the outfield. So going forward, having that versatility, he can always play a really good first base, and getting acclimated to right field at the higher level is only going to benefit Matt and the organization going forward.

AF:  #4 on our list is someone you’ve got to be pretty excited about this year, third baseman Matt Chapman. He’s leading the Texas League in home runs with 11, which isn’t an easy thing to do, and he’s been taking some walks as well. So what have you been seeing out of Matt Chapman at the Double-A level this year?

Matt Chapman

Matt Chapman

BO:  He’s been exciting from the moment he stepped in the organization. We picked late in the first round that year. And Eric Kubota identified Matt Chapman as somebody we’d have a chance to get with our pick that year in the draft but also somebody he thought was going to be a high caliber first-round pick, and he’s proven correct. I mean, Matt Chapman’s exciting. He’s got a ton of natural power to all fields, not just pull-side power. He’s got plenty of power to the opposite field, which he showed on a few homers in major league spring training. His throwing arm is top shelf – as good a throwing arm as you’ll see out there. For Team USA, when he was a rising prospect, I think he threw 100 mph as a reliever – his arm’s that good. And he showed it in major league spring training. I think he got voted one of the top defensive third basemen last year in the minor leagues. He’s a natural fielder, and he’s capable of sliding over to shortstop and playing a really good shortstop as well. The power is definitely going to be there, and it’s exciting to see him tighten the strike zone and improve the walk-to-strikeout ratio.

AF:  With the arm he has, do you feel he has enough range and enough natural ability to be able to play shortstop at the major league level?

BO:  Yeah, I think it’s possible. He’s definitely a top-flight third base defender, but it’s not out of the realm of possibility that he could log some games at shortstop at that level.

AF:  #5 on our list is third baseman Renato Nunez. He got off to a good start at Nashville this year and he’s been leading the team in home runs there. So how do you feel about the way he seems to be handling things at Triple-A this year?

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Renato Nunez

BO:  It’s been exciting to watch Renato’s development. He’s made adjustments at every level. He hit almost 30 home runs in the California League, then he cut down on his strikeouts dramatically moving up to Double-A, and he’s continued to tighten the strike zone at the Triple-A level. And he’s got a nice swing – it’s short, it’s compact and he produces a lot of home runs with that swing. He’s capable of using the whole field, going line to line. He’s a solid offensive hitting prospect. It’s been fun to see him make the adjustments, and he definitely has a chance to continue that going forward and improve his numbers.

AF:  And what have you seen in terms of his defense at third base so far this year?

BO:  Yeah, he’s been solid over there. He’s definitely an offense-oriented player. But he works hard and shows flashes defensively. We have Eric Martins there, our hitting instructor, but he also has a lot of experience in the infield, and Steve Scarsone, our manager, who also was a very good infielder for a long time. They’re constantly helping Renato develop into a solid infielder. And time, reps and opportunity hopefully lead to progress and we’ll see where it goes.

AF:  #6 on our list is infielder Chad Pinder. He’s another guy who, like Matt Olson, has had some difficulties at Nashville early on. I think he’s only had about half a dozen walks there this year. Can you talk about some of the challenges he’s faced at the Triple-A level this season?

Chad Pinder

Chad Pinder

BO:  Yeah, it’s the same kind of thing we talked about. Triple-A is definitely another step – it’s a challenge. The pitchers are better, but Chad will definitely adjust. He’s been on a hot streak the last 10 or 15 games. He’s making a lot harder, more authoritative contact. He’s tightening the strike zone. He’s always been somewhat of a free swinger, and he’s had success doing that, but Triple-A poses more challenges with that style. He’s a very instinctive player, he’s a smart player and I believe he’ll adjust. Now that he’s seen that caliber of pitching for the first six or seven weeks of the season, we’re slowly seeing him making the adjustments – he’s starting to barrel more baseballs and he’s driving the ball a lot better towards the end of the month. So going forward, it’s definitely going to be exciting to see how he progresses this year. He’s an exciting player, and he’s just going to continue to progress and evolve and make adjustments.

AF:  He’s had about a dozen errors at shortstop so far, and I think a lot of them have been throwing errors. Has he just been rushing things a bit? How do you account for that?

BO:  For one, shortstop’s the most difficult position on the field – you get the most chances. And with young infielders, you don’t judge them by the number of miscues per se. He’s a solid fielder. He’s working hard with Eric Martins, he’s working hard with Steve Scarsone, and he’s continuing to improve. He only went back to full-time shortstop in the last year and a half. He’s steady and he had a solid major league spring training. So going forward, he’ll continue to work at it and he’ll be able to improve his shortstop positioning but also, at some point, be able to play all three infield positions, because you never know when opportunity’s going to arise.

AF:  #7 on our list is a pitcher who’s been at Triple-A this season, Dillon Overton. He’s a little ways past the Tommy John surgery now and it’s my understanding that he’s finally off the leash and free to go. He’s hit a few bumps in a couple of his starts, but his command has continued to be solid. What have you seen out of him at Triple-A this year?

Dillon Overton

Dillon Overton

BO:  Dillon’s a very good pitcher. He reads hitters very well. He just has a natural instinct to pitch, and he moves the ball in and out. He’s got a really advanced changeup and a solid curveball. His fastball will sit comfortably in that 87-91 mph range, a touch more occasionally. But he understands the game, he has a natural instinct for the mound and he’s got very good touch. He’s unpredictable out there as far as his sequencing. So he’s solid. He’ll definitely be a major league pitcher at some point, and then we’ll see exactly what role that is, but he can pitch, for sure.

AF:  Is his velocity about where it was last season or has it ticked up at all this year?

BO:  Yeah, I’d say it’s more similar to where it was last year. And honestly, I think we all saw Dillon pre-surgery and he showed flashes of having more velocity than he has as a pro. But, like you said, he’s got a fantastic strikeout-to-walk ratio. He’s progressed at every level, he gets hitters out, he pitches deep into ballgames now, and he pounds that strike zone. So he’ll be a major league pitcher regardless, and he’ll be a major league pitcher with the arsenal that he has currently.

AF:  #8 on our list was catcher Jacob Nottingham, whom you guys traded away in the offseason in the Khris Davis deal. Can I just ask you how hard it was to trade away a top catching prospect like that whom you guys had just made an effort to acquire?

BO:  I think that all 30 teams are trying to win as many games as possible. We’re excited to have Khris Davis. And when you make a trade, both organizations are trying to improve themselves. We were able to acquire a 30-home-run bat and they were able to acquire a good catching prospect and a solid pitching prospect. So both sides agreed to to the deal, and we’re happy.

AF:  #9 on our list is infielder Yairo Munoz. He got a bit of a late start to the season with some nagging injuries, but he’s been showing some pop in his time with Midland this year. What have you seen out of him in his time at Double-A so far this season?

Yairo Munoz

Yairo Munoz

BO:  He’s a talented kid and he always responds to challenges. He’s got a lot of tools – he’s got pop in his bat, he can run, he’s got a fabulous throwing arm. Matt Chapman and Yairo Munoz have the two best infield throwing arms in the system by far. He’s hit the ground running in Double-A. He got a taste of it last year, he got moved up for the playoffs, and now he’s been off to a good start. Like you said, he had some nagging injuries, but he’s there now and he’s having solid at-bats – he’s driving the baseball. He’s a natural shortstop. With him, Barreto and Chapman, with those three kids capable of playing shortstop, it’s allowed all three of them to gain some versatility by moving around. But Yairo is definitely a solid major league prospect, and I could see him moving up our rankings as time goes on.

AF:  I know he’s been playing shortstop, second base and now a little bit of third base this year. So do you see him continuing to see time at all three of those positions as the season continues?

BO:  Yeah, I just believe that the best players normally start off as shortstops. So from a draft process or when you sign a kid internationally, a lot of times you sign shortstops or you draft shortstops. And in our case, in the last couple of years, between Barreto, Chapman and Munoz, they’re all at the same stage of their development at Double-A. They all have shortstop/third base experience, but they’re on the same team. They can’t all play one position, so they’re going to move around and gain versatility and also help that team win ballgames.

Richie Martin

Richie Martin

AF:  Well, speaking of shortstops, #10 on our list is shortstop Richie Martin. Everyone was really looking forward to getting a better look at him in his first full season this year. Obviously it must have been disappointing to see him get hurt. But even though he’s been off the field, can you tell me what you like about Richie Martin based on what you’d seen out of him prior to his knee injury this spring?

BO:  Yeah, Richie’s got a very good shortstop profile. He’s strong defensively – he’s got all the actions you want to see. He’s got a strong throwing arm, he’s got very good hands and he’s got tremendous agility and flexibility for the shortstop position. Offensively, he’s got a line-drive bat and he uses the field. And I believe, last year, he was one of the youngest players from the SEC who got drafted. He’s got tools, he has intangibles and he’s got really good makeup. It’ll be exciting to see when he gets on the field and shows what he can do.

AF:  And with Nottingham off our list due to the trade, we replaced him with pitcher Casey Meisner. When he came over from the Mets in the Tyler Clippard trade last year, he got off to a great start and looked really solid at Stockton last season. But he seems to be struggling with his command a bit this year. So can you tell me what you’ve seen out of him so far this season?

BO:  He’s a tall kid – he’s 6’7”. When he’s pitching very well, he’s had a great angle on the ball – he throws downhill, throws strikes. He’s got a pretty good changeup and a solid breaking ball. At Stockton, it’s an offense-oriented park…and Stockton can be challenging. Starting this year, he’s been okay, but definitely he needs to keep on working on pounding that strike zone, getting ahead in the count and having a strong second half going forward.

AF:  And finally, one guy who wasn’t on our top 10 list, or many others, whom I have to ask you about just because he’s gotten off to such a great start is pitcher Daniel Mengden. He seems like a really smart pitcher who’s been tremendous so far this year. So what you’ve seen out of him and what accounts for his great start this season?

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Daniel Mengden

BO:  He’s a student of the game. In college, he was a top-flight pitching prospect. He got dinged up in his junior year and it caused him to fall in the draft to the fourth round. Houston was able to get him there and then we were able to acquire Daniel and Jacob Nottingham in the Scott Kazmir trade. And since he’s come over, he’s been fabulous. He’s been up to 95-96 mph with the fastball. He’s got a solid breaking ball and a good changeup. He’s absolutely pounded the zone and been very efficient and aggressive. He keeps a book on the hitters. He’s been outstanding and it’s been fun to watch. He’s met every challenge and, going forward, we expect more of the same.

AF:  So is there anything else he needs to do to get to the next level?

BO:  He’s at Triple-A now and he’s knocking on the door. He’s putting up zeroes, he’s a diligent worker and he’s been very aggressive. When he came over to the system, he acclimated very well. So the future’s definitely bright!

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Monday, May 23rd: Dillon Overton Pitches Sounds to Victory with Help of HRs from Matt Olson & Renato Nunez while Richie Martin Makes Season Debut in Ports Loss

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Nashville Sounds Pitcher Dillon Overton (6 IP / 5 H / 1 ER / 1 BB / 7 K / Win)

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Nashville Sounds Pitcher Dillon Overton (6 IP / 5 H / 1 ER / 1 BB / 7 K / Win)

 

PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE  (Triple-A)

Nashville Sounds  7

Las Vegas 51s        4

WP – Overton 3-4 / 4.03

HR – Nunez (8), Olson (4)

Prospect Of The Game:

Pitcher Dillon Overton

(6 IP / 5 H / 1 ER / 1 BB / 7 K / Win)

LHP Dillon Overton delivered his second straight impressive start for the Sounds on Monday, giving up just 1 run while striking out 7 over 6 innings of work to notch his 3rd win for Nashville. And Overton has now allowed just 2 runs and struck out 15 in 12 2/3 innings over his last two starts for the Sounds. LHP Patrick Schuster got the final five outs for his 4th save. Third baseman Renato Nunez and right fielder Matt Olson both doubled and hit 2-run homers, while left fielder Andrew Lambo collected 3 hits, and first baseman Ryon Healy and catcher Bruce Maxwell had a pair of hits apiece. Rehabbing second baseman Jed Lowrie went 1 for 4 with a walk, while Josh Phegley, serving as the designated hitter for the night, went 1 for 3 with a pair of walks in his third rehab appearance with the Sounds.

Click here for more on Midland, Stockton & Beloit…

Sunday, May 15th: Matt Olson & Henderson Alvarez Lead Sounds to Victory while Daniel Gossett & Tyler Marincov Help Ports Prevail

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Nashville Sounds Outfielder Matt Olson (3 for 4 / 2 Doubles / RBI / SB)

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Nashville Sounds Outfielder Matt Olson (3 for 4 / 2 Doubles / RBI / SB)

 

PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE  (Triple-A)

Fresno Grizzlies      3

Nashville Sounds  6

WP – Alvarez 1-0 / 3.45

Prospect Of The Game:

Outfielder Matt Olson

(3 for 4 / 2 Doubles / RBI / SB)

After going 1 for his last 11, right fielder Matt Olson had a big day at the plate on Sunday, collecting 3 hits, including a pair of doubles, driving in a run and even swiping a base for the Sounds. First baseman Rangel Ravelo singled, doubled and drove in a run, while third baseman Max Muncy singled, walked twice, scored twice and stole a base. RHP Henderson Alvarez, in what’s expected to be his last rehab start for the Sounds, allowed 2 runs on 6 hits, walked 1 and struck out 8 over 5 innings of work to earn the win, while LHP Patrick Schuster tossed 2 1/3 scoreless innings in relief to notch his 3rd save for Nashville.

Click here for more on Midland, Stockton & Beloit…

A’s Farm Report for Week of May 2-8: Checking in on A’s Top Prospects

Matt Chapman

Texas League HR leader Matt Chapman

This week, we’re going to take some time to check in on the players who are considered to be some of the A’s most promising prospects – the players who were most prominently featured in this preseason’s top 10 and top 20 lists. Among the A’s top 10 prospects, third baseman Matt Chapman, who’s currently the Texas League home run leader, and fellow third baseman Renato Nunez, who leads Nashville in numerous offensive categories, have been the season’s most impressive performers. And among the organization’s top 20 prospects, pitcher Daniel Mengden, who’s surrendered a total of just two runs over his first six starts, has been the clear standout so far this season. A version of this weekly minor league report by Athletics Farm originally appeared on Athletics Nation

 

Click here for this week’s update on Nashville, Midland, Stockton & Beloit…

Thursday, April 28th: Max Muncy & Matt Olson Homer to Help Sounds win while Dylan Covey Pitches Hounds to Victory

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Nashville Sounds Left Fielder Max Muncy (Home Run / 3 RBIs)

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Nashville Sounds Left Fielder Max Muncy (Home Run / 3 RBIs)

 

PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE  (Triple-A)

Nashville Sounds      7

Round Rock Express  3

WP – Smith 1-3 / 6.31

HR – Muncy (5), Olson (3)

Prospect Of The Game:

Left Fielder Max Muncy

(Home Run / 3 RBIs)

Left fielder Max Muncy smashed his team-leading 5th home run, a 3-run shot, in the top of the 5th inning to provide the Sounds with a healthy 5-run cushion on their way to besting Round Rock on Thursday. It was Muncy’s 3rd home run in his last 4 games and extended his current hitting streak to 8 games. Muncy currently leads all Sounds regulars in batting average (.292), on-base percentage (.382) and slugging percentage (.569). Right fielder Matt Olson socked his 3rd home run, a solo shot, in the 8th, while shortstop Chad Pinder singled in a run and drove in another with a sacrifice fly, and second baseman Joey Wendle singled, tripled and scored twice for the Sounds. Starter Chris Smith allowed 3 runs, just 1 earned, over 5 2/3 innings of work to earn his 1st win for Nashville. It’s expected that catcher/outfielder Matt McBride will be rejoining Nashville on Friday once LHP Sean Manaea is officially added to the A’s roster to make his major league debut Friday night against the Astros.

Click here for more on Midland, Stockton & Beloit…

Friday, April 22nd: Beloit Wins behind Skye Bolt’s Big Bat while Stockton Wins in a Walk-Off & Nashville Falls despite Sean Manaea’s Solid Start

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Beloit Snappers Outfielder Skye Bolt (2 for 4 / Triple / Double / Walk / 3 RBIs)

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Beloit Snappers Outfielder Skye Bolt (2 for 4 / Triple / Double / Walk / 3 RBIs)

 

MIDWEST LEAGUE  (Class-A)

Beloit Snappers  4

Burlington Bees    3

WP – Manarino 2-0 / 1.04

Prospect Of The Game:

Outfielder Skye Bolt

(2 for 4 / Triple / Double / Walk / 3 RBIs)

Last year’s 4th-round draft pick for the A’s, center fielder Skye Bolt, continued his hot start to the season by driving in 3 of the Snappers’ 4 runs on Friday. The 22-year-old tripled and scored in the 3rd inning to put Beloit on the board, then doubled in both the tying and winning runs in the top of the 7th for the Snappers. Bolt is now batting .340 for the season, which ties him for the team lead with fellow outfielder Brett Siddall, who tripled and walked in the game. Left fielder Justin Higley had 3 hits, a walk and a stolen base, while catcher Santiago Chavez had a pair of hits for the Snappers. Starter James Naile gave up 2 runs over 4 innings of work, while LHP Evan Manarino allowed just 1 run in 4 innings of relief to earn his 2nd win, and LHP Jared Lyons pitched a perfect 9th to pick up the save.

Click here for more on Nashville, Midland & Stockton…

Friday, April 15th: Daniel Mengden Dominates & Ryon Healy Homers in Hounds Win while Renato Nunez & Matt Olson Homer in Sounds Victory & John Nogowski Helps Ports Prevail in 17

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Midland RockHounds Pitcher Daniel Mengden (6 IP / 2 H / 0 ER / 3 BB / 8 K)

A’s Prospect Of The Day: Midland RockHounds RHP Daniel Mengden (6 IP / 2 H / 0 ER / 3 BB / 8 K)

 

TEXAS LEAGUE  (Double-A)

Arkansas Travelers        0

Midland RockHounds  1

WP – Kurcz 2-0 / 2.25

HR – Healy (2)

Prospect Of The Game:

Pitcher Daniel Mengden

(6 IP / 2 H / 0 ER / 3 BB / 8 K)

RHP Daniel Mengden, who was acquired last summer from from the Astros in the Scott Kazmir trade, delivered his second straight dominant start for the RockHounds on Friday. The 23-year-old Texas native allowed just 2 hits while striking out 8 over 6 shutout innings, and he has now struck out 16 over 12 scoreless frames in his first two starts of the season. When Mengden exited after the 6th inning, the game was a scoreless tie, and it remained that way until first baseman Ryon Healy led off the bottom of the 9th by blasting a home run, his second in the last two days, into the left field bullpen to give the RockHounds the walk-off win. RHP Trey Cochran-Gill tossed a scoreless 7th and 8th, and RHP Aaron Kurcz got the last three outs in the top of the 9th to pick up the win for Midland.

Click here for more on Nashville, Stockton & Beloit…

Exclusive: Down On The Farm with A’s Special Assistant Grady Fuson

gfDSC01787-1[2c]Long-time baseball man Grady Fuson served as the A’s scouting director from 1995 until 2001, when the team drafted such talented players as Eric ChavezTim HudsonMark MulderBarry Zito and Rich Harden. He left the A’s at the end of 2001 to become the assistant general manager of the Texas Rangers and, after moving on to head up the Padres scouting department, Fuson eventually returned to the A’s a little over six years ago to serve as a special assistant to the front office.

Of course, many know Fuson as the scout in the cinematic version of Moneyball who has a dramatic confrontation with Billy Beane and ends up getting fired – though that’s not quite how it happened (which we chronicled here).

During spring training, Fuson can most frequently be found patrolling the A’s minor league fields, now located at Fitch Park in Mesa, while keeping a close eye on the team’s most prized prospects. And it was there that we took the opportunity to pick the brain of one of baseball’s top talent evaluators to get the scoop on some of the A’s top hitting and pitching prospects…

 

AF:  The A’s have had a big crop of talented young players passing through the major league camp this year. So is it exciting to have a bunch of young guys like that around who are right on the cusp of breaking through?

GF:  Well the good thing is, after the trades last year, there’s a different look to the system now that there’s been some trades and we’ve brought some talent back. And last year’s draft looks looks like it’s panning out. So, within one year, you’ve seen the talent base come back pretty strong…That whole crew that was in Double-A last year – Nunez and Pinder and Olson – it’s a good group. And now there’s more depth coming in from behind.

AF:  Well, let me ask you about some of those guys in particular. Chad Pinder, whom I know you’ve always been high on, had a big year in the Texas League last year, which isn’t easy for anyone to do. And he’s had the chance to spend a lot of time in the big league camp. So what have you been seeing out of him this spring?

cp640461bGF:  He’s had a great camp. And the most impressive thing is all the early work and side work that [A’s infield coach] Ron Washington does in the backfields. Wash really didn’t know him, and Wash has been really, really impressed. And he agrees with me – there’s no reason why this guy can’t play a major league shortstop. He’s had a good camp. His at-bats have been good – they’ve been quality. I think he’s made a very positive impression on everybody.

AF:  It looks like he’ll be the primary shortstop at Nashville this year. But do you think he’ll be seeing a little time at other spots as well just to continue developing his versatility?

GF:  Yeah, it’s important to keep his versatility, for when he’s ready to make the next jump. So he’s going to play some second base, maybe he goes and plays third a little bit, but he’ll be a primary shortstop – he’s earned it.

AF:  Now what about Renato Nunez? He was able to keep his power numbers up at Midland last year, which is no small feat. But what does he still need to be working on at this point?

rn600524dGF: He’s working much better as far as his practice time, his B.P. time, his drill work. He’s trying to stay centered, trying to hit the ball to the middle of the field and to the opposite field. His natural move is to the pull side of the field, so there’s that deep count, breaking ball thing that kind of gets him in trouble. And his footwork with his throwing, his hands and his actions – his reactions have really improved over the years. He’s getting better with his feet, but there’s still some things with his throwing, getting his legs underneath him and his stride and tempo and pace, to improve his accuracy.

AF:  So do you think we’re still primarily going to be seeing him at third base this year? Or do you think he’s going end up getting much time at first base?

GF:  Probably mostly third. But everybody has to be versatile to some degree, so he’s probably going to have to go over there from time to time. If [Max] Muncy’s in Triple-A, we’ll see how that whole thing works itself out.

AF:  Matt Olson has gotten a good amount of time in the big league camp this spring, and he’s set to start out the year at Nashville. I’d like to know what you’ve been seeing out him lately and what you think he’s got to do to take things to the next level?

mo621566bGF:  Nothing’s really different – you know, defending, doing all the things he does well. And he’s showed some power. At the same time, the swing-and-miss, sometimes that catches up to him a little bit. But the bottom line is, he goes over there and some of those things get exposed and it just reminds us all what needs to happen to make this guy complete. He’s still young, he’s still learning, and he’s at a higher level of baseball now. But he comes to play, he does all the right things, and he never takes his offense to his defense. So he just needs to get his at-bats and get things going.

AF:  He played a lot of right field, particularly in the second half, at Midland last season. Do you think we’re going to end up seeing as much of him in the outfield as first base at Nashville this year?

GF: Yeah, I think that’ll take place as the season goes on. He’s an above average first baseman. He can play the outfield, but his defense lies at first. So it’s all going to depend on the depth of that club in the outfield and what’s needed out there. It’s certainly not a bad idea that he continues to go out there from time to time. But nobody’s trying to make him a full-time outfielder.

AF:  Now second baseman Joey Wendle was at Nashville all last season, but he never got a September call-up. So what does he need to do this year to try to move up the ladder?

jw621563dGF:  If you’re asking me personally, I think he’s a very gifted instinctual hitter. This guy can square up a baseball anywhere in the strike zone. He’s jumpy, he’s aggressive. If there’s anything I would like to see him do is kind of back down and become a hair more patient. I know he loves to swing it, and he can hit it. There’s a lot of things he can hit, but he can’t hit it all with quality. There’s still some polish on some pivots that I think he can take another move with. But this guy’s a gamer, and he plays hard – he plays with his hair on fire. He had a very solid year when it was all said and done in Triple-A. So he’s waiting in the wings and trying to make some improvements on some things that he needs to work on.

AF:  So far, he’s only played exclusively at second base here. Is there any thought to trying to increase his versatility at all?

GF:  No, he’s not the kind of guy that you would see moving to short or third.

AF:  Well, I guess second base it is then! I wanted to ask you about Max Muncy, whom you mentioned earlier. Are you expecting him to basically be splitting time between first base and third base again this year at Nashville?

GF:  Yeah, we haven’t had that discussion yet, but Bob [Melvin] has used him at both in big league camp. And when you think about the personnel that’s going to Nashville, if he goes back, it’s going to have to be creative – some time at first, some time at third, some time at DH.

AF:  Last year, Tyler Ladendorf broke camp with the A’s. Then he got hurt and was sidelined for much of the season. He’s been playing a lot of center field in camp this spring…

tl502285bGF:  Yeah, and he’s shined!

AF:  Do you expect we’re going to be seeing a lot more of him in center field this year at Nashville?

GF:  Yeah, ever since a year and a half ago, that’s what we’re trying to create out of him is maybe that super utility type guy. But he’s done an absolutely fabulous job in center. They hit these balls deep in gaps, and you’ve really seen him run down some balls and be instinctual. So it’s been a positive, positive thing for him.

AF:  So, with his ability to play second base and shortstop as well, it looks like he could really be a legitimate option up the middle for you across the board.

GF:  Sure, yeah.

AF:  You don’t really have that many true center fielders at the top of the system right now, so I guess that’s a good spot to have him in. Speaking of which, do you see Jaycob Brugman spending more time in center field than in the corners this season? Where do you see him spending most of his time this year?

GF:  Probably more center this year – he plays it well. He’s one of the best we’ve got, so he’ll probably spend a lot of time there. He’ll move from time to time but right now, the way it looks, mostly center.

AF:  Okay, let’s touch on some of the younger guys. I know you always talked about Matt Chapman’s power potential, and he’s really been showing it. He had a good season at Stockton last year. And he’s spent a lot of time in the big league camp this year and he’s really been having a great spring here.

mc656305cGF:  Yeah, he’s probably been the talk of this camp. You know, every year there’s a new kid who’s fortunate enough to have a very high-performance camp, and Chapman’s been the guy. And it’s putting pressure on some of the other infielders – they’re all wanting to change positions! But he’s done well. His B.P.’s have been electric, he’s driving the ball to right-center like nobody else, and he’s just had a very, very impressive camp all around.

AF:  What kind of challenges to do you see him facing in Double-A at Midland this year?

GF:  First of all, health. Let’s just find a way to stay on the field. He’s been with us a year and a half now. The year we signed him, he kind of broke down in Beloit. Then he broke down coming in last year and missed a lot of time early and got a late start, and then broke down with the wrist. So he needs to get 500 at-bats and 140 games. But he’s doing great things. He’s starting to get a little more rhythmic with his swing – not being so rigid – and you’re starting to see the results of that. I mean, who knows what the competition’s like? With his limited amount of experience, he could have some struggles early. But hopefully he’s the kind of guy who starts to figure some things out. So, a learning first-half and a performance second-half.

AF:  Well, we’ve certainly seen that happen before.

GF:  He’s been having a performance big league camp!

AF:  Another top prospect who’ll be at Midland this season is shortstop Franklin Barreto. I remember when you were first seeing him here last spring after you guys acquired him and he ended up getting into camp late and got off to a bit of a slow start. What kind of progress have you seen out of him since then over this past year?

fb620439bGF:  Amazing. Either I was completely blind or…this guy’s not anything like it looked when he first got here a year ago. He’s got an instinct for the baseball defensively – he’s not polished yet, but that’s the least of our worries. I mean, footwork, technique – we can do a great job cleaning that stuff up. But there’s a lot of life in his bat – the ball jumps. And he’s actually throwing it a little bit better in my opinion this spring. I mean, the whole package – it’s there.

AF:  So does he maybe remind you a little bit of Miguel Tejada at this point?

GF:  Yeah, that’s a good call.

AF:  Are we going to be seeing him at any positions other than shortstop this year? Is he going to get looks at second base or in center field at all?

GF:  Yeah, depending on the health of Yairo Munoz. Munoz has kind of been tender [dealing with a lingering quad injury]. He hasn’t done much early in camp. But if they both go to Midland, then they’re both going to have some time at second at short – if that’s the way it ends up.

AF:  Yeah, David Forst had mentioned a couple months ago that maybe they both might go to Midland and end up sharing time at second and short there. But what about Munoz’s progress last year? He started out the season not so hot at Beloit, then he gets bumped up to Stockton, and suddenly he looks like a whole different guy.

ym622168bGF:  Well you know…he can be a live wire one minute and he can kind of be a downer the next. It’s just about waiting for him to grow into being a man – getting some maturity mentally. And I think that was the big change, once he left Beloit and went to a higher level of competition. You talk to [Stockton manager] Rick Magnante, and he was a model citizen in the time he was at Stockton. And it showed up in his performance – he played better in Stockton than he played in Beloit. He’s always a guy that there’s some maintenance to, but that’s what we do here. Their character, their work ethic, their maturity is as big in the coaching arena as taking B.P. and doing all the drill work. He’s an extremely talented kid, and he does things different than a lot of people. He’s strong, he’s physical – he and Chapman probably have the two best arms you’re going to see in this system.

AF:  Well, given the challenge last year, he seemed to rise to the occasion anyway.

GF: Oh, definitely.

rm621006cAF:  Another top shortstop prospect who’s been in camp this spring is your #1 pick from last year, Richie Martin. He was over in the big league camp for a while. So what have you been seeing out of him in his first spring with the organization?

GF:  We didn’t do a lot with him last summer offensively, which is what we do with most of them for a while. If we’re going to start to tinker, it usually starts in instructional league. And the only thing we did in instructional league was just tried to build some rhythm moves into his swing. And it’s coming, it’s looking better – it’s certainly coming off his bat better. He’s not cutting his swing off. Defensively, you know, this guy’s not far off. He’s got to learn the pace of the game, so that he doesn’t overcharge and things like that. But as far as the skill set, no issues.

AF:  Okay, let’s talk about a couple of pitchers. First off, Sean Manaea – everyone’s been pretty excited about him here this spring. He’s set to start the year at Triple-A Nashville. So what does he need to do to get himself to the next level?

sm640455cGF:  Right now, it looks like just stay healthy. I mean, he’s been pretty dominant since we got him. Last year in the Texas League, he had 3-4-5 dominant starts. In the [Arizona] Fall League, he had a couple of dominant starts. And he’s been dominant for the most part down here in camp as well. You know, some command issues here and there – maybe a little violent move there. When he gets the adrenaline flowing, he gets a little off line and it wreaks a little havoc sometimes with his command – but that’s part of the growing curve. But the bottom line is, this guy’s been facing big leaguers up there. It’s not like he’s been pitching in the seventh inning against non-roster call-ups. He’s faced people’s big league names, and he’s had some dominant innings.

AF:  So it sounds like it won’t be long before he’s ready.

GF:  Yeah, I wouldn’t think so.

AF:  Another left-hander who got some time in big league camp is Dillon Overton. He’s been on that post-Tommy John recovery curve for a while, but he’s looked good here in camp this spring. So where is he at now and what have you been seeing out of him?

do592614cGF:  He’s healthy. He came in and you could tell he was prepared. He was a tick firmer – a lot of 88-92s. He pitched well – he put up zeroes. I think he had 6 innings with zeroes across the board – good changeups, his breaker was working.

AF:  I was going to ask you if his velocity was up a bit, and it sounds like it is.

GF:  Yeah, it is. It’s not what some people saw prior to him being hurt, but I don’t think he needs to get all that back to be a major league guy. And this is going to be the first year when he’s going to be opened up – there’s no restrictions.

AF:  So are there any other guys you’re feeling particularly good about this year that we ought to be keeping an eye on?

GF:  Yeah, two pitchers – Daniel Gossett and Brett Graves. Graves, when we drafted him, we thought he was a 90-95ish type guy. And from day one, the velocity’s been light. Last year was not a very good year. His breaking ball comes and goes. But this guy seemed really smart, he seemed like he was really into making himself a better pitcher. Late last year, we were trying to find out, “What’s missing, why do you think your velocity’s light?” “I don’t know, I haven’t changed anything.” I said, “Something’s had to change.” “I haven’t changed anything.” Well, come to find out, he stopped long-tossing. So he went back on a long-toss program for the last month or month and a half there and stayed on it all winter. And he’s been 92-96 every time out down here – good delivery, breaker’s harder and sharper, he’s throwing tremendous. And Gossett has slowed down his pace a little bit and he’s come back firmer. And he cut his hair, so he’s got better aerodynamics coming down the mound. [Laughter]

AF:  I’d heard Gossett had maybe added a cutter too.

GF:  Well, [minor league pitching coordinator] Gil Patterson is back, so Gil gives everybody a cutter. He’s the cutter master!

AF:  So I’m assuming we’re most likely to be seeing those two guys at Stockton this year.

GF:  Yeah, most likely.

AF:  Okay great, well we’ll definitely be sure to keep an eye on the two of them this year then. Thanks!

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Olson, Pinder & Chapman: Trio of Top Prospects Talks about Spending the Spring in Big League Camp

mo621566b#3 on A’s Farm’s Top 10 Prospect List, Matt Olson is one of the top young power-hitting prospects in the A’s system. He was the A’s third overall pick in the 2012 draft, selected right behind shortstops Addison Russell and Daniel Robertson, who would soon become his roommates and two of us his closest friends. A first baseman by trade, Olson began increasing his versatility by spending a good amount of time in right field at Midland last year. He’s set to get his first taste of Triple-A this season at Nashville, where we’ll get to see what kind of damage his big bat can do in the Pacific Coast League.

AF:  Well, this is the first time you’ve spent a prolonged period of time in the big league camp. So what’s it been like for you and what have you been able to get out of the experience?

MO:  It’s been good…it’s a nice feeling to be around these guys and soak up whatever they’re doing and just watch what they’re doing…I’m more of an observer than going up and asking things. So I watch guys’ routines and just how they carry themselves.

AF:  Now you spent last season at Midland, which isn’t known as a hitter’s paradise. So what kind of challenges did you face and what did you have to deal with as a hitter there?

MO:  Yeah, like you said, it’s generally not known as a hitter’s park, especially for lefties. But the thing is the mental side of it. You know, I kind of had to deal with the mental side of not letting the park affect me at the plate. And I did have a little time during the season where I did let it affect me. And I kind of had to remind myself to just go through your at-bat the way you normally would. And I started seeing some results after that.

AF:  So how does the major league pitching you’ve had a chance to face over here compare to some of the minor league pitching you’ve faced in the past?

MO:  Guys just have a better feel for their stuff, maybe a little better stuff, a little tighter sliders, faster fastballs. But mainly they just know what they’re doing better and they know how to approach each at-bat better.

AF:  You’ve always been a first baseman, but you spent a lot of time playing right field last year at Midland, particularly during the second half of the season. So where are you expecting to be position-wise this coming season?

MO:  I’ve been working out at first and outfield so far this spring. I’m pretty comfortable doing either – so wherever they need me, wherever I have a spot in the lineup.

AF:  You’ve always had a reputation as a pretty solid defensive first baseman. So what was it like when you first started going out and spending time in the outfield? What particular challenges are involved in getting used to playing out there?

MO:  It’s just different as far as knowing what to do with each ball – knowing what to do with a ball down the line, who to pick up when you’re coming to throw the ball to the cut-off. There was definitely a learning curve. I wouldn’t say I’m 100% comfortable out there – I don’t think I should be. I’ve just really been starting to pick it up in the past year or so. But I’m just trying to get some work in and get more comfortable out there to where I can just not even think about anything and just let it happen.

AF:  So have you seen or talked to your old roommates Addison Russell and Daniel Robertson lately?

MO:  I haven’t talked to them much. I actually haven’t seen Addison – he’s got his baby now. But I try to keep in touch with them and talk to them every once in a while. Us three aren’t the best at communicating with each other. But once we get back with each other all hanging out in person, it’s like we didn’t miss a beat.

AF:  And of all your old roommates at Stockton, I guess Chad Pinder was the only one you still had around to keep you company at Midland last year.

MO:  Yeah, just Pinder.

AF:  I remember in Stockton, it was you, Pinder, Robertson, Billy McKinney and Austin House all living together.

MO: Yeah, whoever I live with goes!

 

cp640461b#6 on A’s Farm’s Top 10 Prospect List, Chad Pinder was named the Texas League Player of the Year last season after leading all Midland regulars in batting average and slugging percentage as well as leading the league in total bases. He played exclusively at shortstop last season after primarily appearing at second base the year before at Stockton. Pinder is slated to begin the season as Nashville’s starting shortstop, though his ability to play short, second and third could increase the chances of him seeing some time in Oakland before long.

AF:  You’ve spent a lot of time here in the major league camp this spring, which is always a good thing. So what’s the experience been like for you?

CP:  It’s been awesome – learning a lot, getting my feet wet. So it’s been a good experience.

AF:  Is there anything in particular you’ve experienced here in the big league camp that’ll be helping you out down the road?

CP:  Honestly, just all the reps I’m getting. And I’m learning a lot about different things some of these big leaguers do and how they go about their business – I’d say that’s a big thing. The kind of dedication it takes, what they do around the clubhouse – all the little things I’ve picked up on.

AF:  Has anyone in particular been a big help to you here this spring?

CP:  Working with [A’s infield coach Ron] Washington has been tremendous. I mean, I can’t speak highly enough of him and all the stuff that I’ve gotten from him thus far.

AF:  So have you been out there working in the field with him every morning?

CP:  Just about every single day.

AF:  Is there anything in particular that you’ve picked up from Ron Washington that you’ll really be putting into play going forward?

CP:  Yeah, a lot of the techniques of fielding groundballs, the little things that normally I’ve never worked on, whether it be different arm angles, different angles working around the bag. There’s things that he drills into us.

AF:  And I guess he’s always going to make sure your footwork’s right too!

CP:  Yeah, no doubt, no doubt!

AF:  After spending the previous season playing second base in Stockton, you spent all last year at shortstop in Midland. So what was it like for you to get back into playing shortstop on a daily basis again?

CP:  It was nice, it was awesome. I obviously played it growing up, and I loved the opportunity to get to play it at this level.

AF:  Here in the big league camp, they’ve had you playing a lot of second base. Now moving back over there to second base, do you have to shift gears a bit, or does it come right back to you?

CP:  Yeah, it’s a little bit of shifting gears. But obviously playing there in Stockton for a full year and still getting reps there in practice at second base, it’s fine, it’s not a big deal.

AF:  The ballpark in Midland certainly isn’t known as a hitter’s park, but you obviously had a great season there, being named the Texas League player of the year. So what was the key to your success in the Texas League last year?

CP:  Honestly, I think playing in that environment helped me – knowing that I couldn’t get away with a cheap home run. I had to just focus on hitting line drives. And I think that playing in that environment helped make me a little bit more of a complete hitter last year.

AF:  So the challenge served you well then.

CP:  Yeah, definitely. It made me stay within myself and just try to hit the ball hard and make consistent hard contact.

AF:  Now your long-time roommate Matt Olson has been here in camp with you. It must be nice to have a familiar face around to go through this whole experience with.

CP:  Absolutely. I’ve known Olson basically my entire time in pro ball. And obviously we’ve been very close over the past couple years. So it’s nice to have him here for sure.

AF:  And do you ever see any of your old roommates from Stockton?

CP:  Yeah, I saw [Austin] House the other day. I saw D-Rob [Daniel Robertson]. I played with him in the [Arizona] Fall League this past year and we lived together in the Fall League. And Billy McKinney lives with us now during spring training. So we’re all still good friends.

AF:  So going forward into this season, is there anything you’re looking to try to do in the year ahead?

CP:  Just carrying everything over from last year, just staying consistent and not trying to do too much and just to continue to grow as a player.

 

mc656305c#4 on A’s Farm’s Top 10 Prospect List, Matt Chapman was the A’s #1 pick in the 2014 draft. The team selected him primarily for his defense at the hot corner and his power potential with the bat. And Chapman made good on that potential by leading all A’s minor leaguers with 23 home runs last year while appearing in just 80 games due to injuries. The 22-year-old has been one of the A’s young standouts this spring, clearly impressing manager Bob Melvin and the coaching staff in his first big league camp. Chapman will be starting the season at Double-A Midland, but he could be a prospect who’ll be rising fast.

AF:  You’ve been getting a nice, long look here in your first big league camp. So what’s this whole experience been like for you?

MC:  It’s been a pretty surreal experience. Just to be invited here was an honor. And to be able to be around still and be able to be with the big league team and practice with them and play in games has been a dream come true.

AF:  Well, you’ve obviously been having a lot of success here. So what accounts for how well you’ve been doing this spring?

MC:  I think getting healthy, and all the work that I put in this offseason is paying off. I’ve been working with the coaches – working with Ron Washington, working with [hitting coach Darren] Bush – trying to just keep staying consistent. But I think all the hard work I put in this offseason has helped me prepare for what I’ve been doing. I feel very confident with how hard I worked. So I was prepared.

AF:  Well, it sounds like you definitely didn’t take it easy this offseason. So is there anything in particular that the coaches have been working with you on here?

MC:  Defensively, just being in the right position always and to always be thinking. I was working on my base a lot, defensively, being more level so I can use my hands more and feet. And then offensively, not trying to overswing and do too much, just trying to take a nice consistent swing and not get myself out and make sure that I’m giving myself the best opportunity to get hits.

AF:  Are there any veterans who’ve been particularly helpful to you this spring?

MC:  Billy Butler, Khris Davis, Yonder [Alonso], [Stephen] Vogt, everybody’s been giving me little tips and things to either work on or how to be more professional. So I’m just trying to soak up as much stuff as I can while I’m here.

AF:  So what have you picked up here in big league camp that you’ll be applying going forward?

MC:  Just showing up everyday regardless of what’s going on, and always trying to keep the same positive outlook. You know, it’s a long season, so being able to stay even-keeled. And putting in the work so that, whether you have success or not, you won’t question whether you prepared yourself – you’ll know you gave everything you’ve got and left everything you had out there.

AF:  Well, it looks like you’ll be heading to the Texas League this year. So what are you anticipating for yourself in the season ahead at Midland?

MC:  All I’m really focused on is going out to Midland and playing everyday and staying healthy and just trying to get better and work my way up.

AF:  You’ve always had a reputation as a quality defensive third baseman with a powerful arm, and you’ve made some nice plays here in the spring. So are you still feeling as confident as ever out in the field at third base?

MC:  Of course, you always have to be confident. That’s how you give yourself the best opportunity to have success.

AF:  Well, when you’ve got an arm like yours, I’m sure it makes it a whole lot easier to be confident out there!

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Ray Fosse’s Take on this Spring’s Crop of Top Prospects

rfphoto153BNot only has Ray Fosse now spent three decades as a broadcaster for the Oakland A’s, working alongside names like Bill King, Lon Simmons, Ken Korach and Glen Kuiper, but he’s also a former All-Star catcher who won two World Series rings with the A’s in 1973 and 1974. We took the opportunity to get his take on the A’s current crop of prospects in the major league camp this spring…

AF:  So how do you feel about seeing this new crop of young prospects that have come into the A’s camp this spring?

RF:  I give credit to [scouting director] Eric Kubota and the scouting department – and making the trades, like Franklin Barreto coming from Toronto. Watching him play, he’s been outstanding. But I think the thing that Billy Beane and David Forst, who’s now the general manager, have never said is, “We’re not going to try to win.” And now, you’re hearing clubs are trying to tank it so they can get high draft choices. I’m saying, “Wait a minute, you’re supposed to be trying to win at this level. How do you tell your fans you’re trying to get draft choices?”

AF: What’s been your impression of what some of the younger guys like Franklin Barreto and Matt Chapman have been doing here in the big league camp this spring?

RF:  The main thing to look at with those kids is getting the experience at this level. I experienced it – I knew I was going to Triple-A, but I got a chance to be with the big league players. And that’s something that you can never put a price tag on. But I think Franklin Barreto – just watching him last weekend against the Cubs when the A’s scored three in the bottom of the ninth inning – he ended up getting a base hit to drive in the second run. Then he was on first and, on a base hit, he went to third on his own – first to third, and then scored on a sac fly and tied the game. Just watching, at 20, his development – as [A’s coach] Ron Washington said, “Maybe he knows he’s going to the minor leagues, but what he’s doing is experiencing this.” You can look at Matt Chapman, Franklin Barreto, Chad Pinder and Matt Olson – that’s a pretty good infield for the future. They’re probably all going to develop together and maybe come up together, depending on what happens at this level. But they’re getting experience facing major league pitching in spring training – something that’s invaluable.

AF:  Since you were a catcher, I wanted to ask if you’ve had a chance to see much of catcher Bruce Maxwell this spring and what your impression has been of him.

RF:  Yeah, I like him. And I think it’s a good position to be in, because there’s Stephen Vogt and Josh Phegley, and that’s it! I think what Bob Melvin and his staff are trying to figure out now is, in the event something happens, who’s going to come up. And Maxwell’s shown that he’s got a good idea. And whoever would come up…would be a back up, but it would be a great experience. So if I’m a catcher in the organization, I’m busting it and I’m learning as much as I can. When I signed with Cleveland many, many years ago, they were  looking for catchers because they didn’t have a lot in the organization. And it worked out, because I only spent two full years and two half years in the minor leagues and I was in the big leagues – and that’s signing out of high school as an 18-year-old. So it’s a great opportunity for a catcher. But I’ve enjoyed what Maxwell has done…just the way he seems to want to learn, the way he handles himself behind the plate. And we can never forget the most important job of a catcher is to catch – handle the pitching staff and catch. Offense is so prevalent at every position, but catching and handling the pitching staff are the keys to being a good catcher.

AF:  And since you were a catcher, you also know a little bit about pitchers. So I wanted to ask you what you’ve seen out of the A’s top pitching prospect, Sean Manaea, so far this spring.

RF:  I think the composure…Sean Manaea shows that confidence. Give credit to the A’s organization. The Royals were trying to win a World Series, which they did. And they were willing to give up someone like Manaea to get Ben Zobrist, who turned out great, but then he goes on to the Cubs. So they got him for a World Series…but the A’s were smart in picking up pitching – you can never have too much. And I think Sean Manaea, we may see him in Oakland sooner rather than later – a lot sooner than people think.

AF:  Well, it never hurts when you’re a big left-hander who throws hard, right?

RF:  Exactly. And again, showing the composure at this level. It is spring training, but you’re facing major league hitters. So I think that’s a big plus for him to be able to experience this but also to be able to show that he can pitch.

AF:  Thanks, Ray.

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