Results tagged ‘ Jim Miller ’

Exclusive: A’s Director of Baseball Operations Farhan Zaidi Talks Top Prospects with A’s Farm – Part 1

fzFarhanZaidiLast month, we brought you A’s Farm’s Consensus Top 10 Prospect List, taking a look at some of the team’s top young talent down on the farm. At the time, we offered our own analysis of each of the players on our list. But we wanted to talk with someone who could provide an even deeper insight into the players who represent the future of the A’s. And it’d be hard to find someone with more detailed information on the array of players in the A’s organization than the team’s director of baseball operations, Farhan Zaidi.

Farhan didn’t necessarily take the traditional route into baseball, earning a B.S. in economics from MIT and later earning his Ph.D in economics from UC Berkeley. He originally joined the A’s as a baseball operations analyst in January of 2005 and is currently entering his fifth season as the team’s director of baseball operations. Though he performs many different roles in his current position – including evaluating amateur draft targets, handling contract negotiations and developing advance scouting reports – as the economics major who feels a little disconnected when he’s too far away from his computer, Farhan is basically known as “the numbers guy” who oversees statistical analysis for the team.

We took the opportunity to talk to Farhan earlier in the week while he was making the long and boring drive back from the Royals’ and Rangers’ spring training facility in Surprise, Arizona after the A’s split squad had just lost to the Royals. He made a point of noting early on that he felt a little naked without his computer on hand and apologized for the lack of detailed statistical information that he’d have at the ready. But I think you’ll agree that, even without his computer, Farhan had plenty of valuable and insightful information to offer on all the A’s top prospects…

 

AF:  How would you describe what you do in your current role as director of baseball operations?

FZ:  It’s a real mix of stuff. The work that I was doing when I first started, which was conducting and supervising all the analysis, is still a very big part of my job. But it’s expanded into other things. Contract negotiations with agents – that’s something we split a few ways in the office. I travel with the team during the season. I’m pretty active in developing and maintaining the advance reports that we give to our coaches. And then I’m pretty active in the draft too. During the spring, I try see players who are guys who are first-round considerations for us. And I sort of manage the analysis that we do for the amateur draft as well.

AF:  So as far as the amateur draft goes, you’re both going out and seeing the players in person as well as analyzing their numbers and performance?

FZ:  Yeah.

AF:  Aren’t you quite involved in analyzing and targeting minor league free agents as well?

FZ:  Yeah, we don’t always get to aim super high on the major league free agent side. So pouring over the minor league free agents and being smart about which guys we bring in who can have a material impact on the major league team is a pretty big part of our operation. And guys like that, whether it’s Brandon Moss or Jim Miller or Evan Scribner, those guys play a big role for us every year. And in a year like last year where he have some success, they become all the more important.

AF:  Well, I wanted to ask you about Brandon Moss specifically. Can you tell me a little more about what you saw in him that made you really sit up and take notice?

FZ:  Yeah, it’s funny, he was a guy we had some history with. He actually hit a home run off of us in Japan all the way back in 2008. He’s a guy who was a very high level prospect with the Red Sox at one time and wound up kicking around a little bit and playing for a couple of different organizations prior to the Phillies. And what we try to look for with guys like that in the minor league free agent market isn’t necessarily just what their career track record is, but to try to look for some progression and improvement, where you can take advantage of a guy’s upward trajectory. And even a guy who’s a little bit old for a prospect may have figured something out that’s turned him into a potentially more productive player. And with Moss, there were a couple of things that we looked at. There was how he finished in the second half of his Triple-A season in 2011. If you look at his first half versus his second half splits, he really produced in the second half of that season. We got some good scouting looks at him as well, so the stats and the scouting reports lined up.

arfPCk2bFI2AF:  Well, let’s get to the top 10 guys on our A’s prospect list plus maybe a couple of others. So starting out at the top of everyone’s list is your #1 draft pick from last year, shortstop Addison Russell. He obviously looked great in his first stint in pro ball last season, and he moved up through three different levels very quickly. So now that you’ve had a chance to see him in the major league camp this spring, what are your impressions of him at this point after having seen a little more of him?

FZ:  Yeah, nothing we’ve seen has made us any less excited about his long-term prospects. He’s a really good athlete. He has the potential to be a five-tool player down the road. And having him in big league camp is less about trying to get him into the immediate plans and more about giving him a taste of being around big leaguers and the big league coaching staff and a chance for our staff to get to know him a little bit better. I think it was a little bit overwhelming for him at first, but I think he’s getting increasingly comfortable. He played a few innings today and made a couple of nice plays in the field. It’s just exciting to have a kid like that who has those kinds of tools and backs it up with performance at a very young age. So, obviously, we’re excited about him. We’re going to let him develop at his own pace. But I think it’s been a really good experience for him and for our coaching staff to have him in camp.

AF:  How likely is it that he starts the season at Stockton in the California League?

FZ:  It’s a possibility, but we haven’t made a decision one way or another. He’s going to spend some time in the big league camp, and then he’ll spend some time in the minor league camp with the player development guys there. So that decision is still a little bit down the road.

AF:  Well, you guys were obviously pretty aggressive in moving him along last year. Are you still prone to being aggressive with him as long as he shows he can handle things?

FZ:  I wouldn’t characterize us as wanting to be aggressive with him but I think, more and more, I personally realize that every player really needs to be brought along at his won pace. Some guys have very slow and steady progress, repeating levels when needed. And for other guys, they can move really quickly and have the aptitude to play up to higher competition levels very quickly. So it really is a player thing, and that determination just hasn’t been made on Addison yet. But along the way, it’ll all be about what’s the best thing for him. And what past players have done, either inside our organization or with other teams, won’t have any bearing on it.

dsstraily-dan3AF:  Okay, second on our list is another guy who had a great minor league season and moved up through three levels last year and made it up to Oakland late in the season – and that’s right-hander Dan Straily. So how are you feeling about his development at this point and what he still needs to work on to clear that last hurdle?

FZ:  Obviously, the prospect status that he has now is one of the biggest and most positive developments for our organization from last year, and it’s a testament to all our player development. But I think the most exciting thing about him, from both a scouting and a statistical thing, is his ability to miss bats. Probably the single best predictor of success in the big leagues is guys who miss bats and get strikeouts in the minors. And he obviously did that in spades last year. I think getting to the big leagues and getting acclimated to the discipline that hitters at this level have, that you don’t get quite as many swings and misses out of the strike zone, you have to be able to pitch in the zone, and you have to be able to pitch with your fastball. I think those are the kinds of adjustments that Dan’s going to have to make. And I think he started to make them a little. I think he sort of learned through his experience last year that big league hitters don’t miss mistakes the way that minor league hitters do. So you have less of a margin for error, and part of limiting your margin for error is not walking guys and not putting extra guys on base. So I think he’s going to come out this year with a better understanding of that and more aggressively throw more strikes, and I think those will be very good things for him.

AF:  I interviewed him recently. And he seems to be a guy who’s pretty smart and really seems to like to think about pitching a lot, so hopefully that’s a good sign!

FZ:  Yeah, absolutely. I get the exact same impression off him. And with a guy like that, you don’t even have to say too much to him because you know that he probably has a good awareness of who he is and what he needs to work on.

AF:  Third on our list is your 2010 top draft pick, outfielder Michael Choice. After his big year at Stockton, there were big hopes for him last year at Midland. He struggled a bit in the first half and then, just when it looked like he was starting to turn it around, he got injured and missed the rest of the season. Obviously, he’s been hitting really well in spring camp so far this year. So what are your impressions of him at this stage of his development?

mcmichaelchoiceoaklandathleticsphotodaynwngr_fbjvxl3FZ:  Yeah, he’s looked terrific in camp, and I think it’s encouraging because this is a continuation of the way he finished the year. He was really the hottest hitter in the Texas League when he, unfortunately, got hurt. And it’s too bad for his development that he missed out on the end of the season because who knows how far he could have gotten. You never know how a guy’s going to come back from injury, physically and mentally, in terms of missing the reps that he missed. But he’s been one of the most effective hitters in camp. He’s hit all the pitches. He’s hit good pitching. It’s not like he’s getting all these hits against minor leaguers or guys who are in late in the game. He’s played a good center field, which is also a major part of what he could potentially offer. The biggest thing for him, when we first got him, the one thing that really stood out about him was just the bat speed. Just sitting in the scouts section, you could hear everybody’s breath be taken away every time he’d take one of those big swings. And the issue for him was shortening up and refining his mechanics to the point where he could really hit that high quality pitching. And I think this has been one of the best jobs that our player development has done – giving him a swing that was simple enough that it could work at the major league level. And that’s what he’s really shown so far this spring.

AF:  So do you see him as a potentially legitimate major league center fielder then?

FZ:  He’s still playing center field. As long as he’s playing center field, he’s a potential major league center fielder. He has the physical ability to stay out there. And part of it, quite frankly, is gong to be, when he reaches the big leagues, what the big league outfield looks like, where we have needs. That might be as big a part of the equation as where we think his best position is.

AF:  Is it reasonable to expect that we’re going to see him starting the year at Sacramento?

FZ:  Yeah, that’s the hope. And certainly he’s done nothing to dissuade that notion so far.

sgsonnygray_large1AF:  Fourth on our list is another #1 draft pick who started out the year at Midland, right-hander Sonny Gray. And like Choice, he started out the season a little wobbly – I guess he was working on his delivery along with his changeup – and then he started to put it together a little more at the end. So where do you think Sonny Gray is at this stage of the game?

FZ:  Well, he’s a guy who now in two straight big league camps has really turned heads with his stuff, with just the life on his fastball and then his curveball – he has those two big league pitches. Sonny’s a guy who’s really stood out in the past couple of years. For him, it’s really been a couple of things. One is working and refining his changeup. He has a good changeup – he just really has to learn to trust it and use it more. And another part of that is he’s probably got to not have things speed up on him when things unravel a little bit. Sometimes he maybe just needs to not out-think himself on the mound and just trust his stuff, because his stuff is clearly major league caliber. We really liked the development of him last year. It’s not easy for a starting pitcher to go straight to Double-A and stay in that rotation all year and actually finish the year in Triple-A. So we’re very optimistic about him continuing that progression. He has things to work on, but we knew he had things to work on when we drafted him, and he’s already improved in those dimensions.

AF:  Fifth on our list is Grant Green. He’s obviously moved around a lot since he was your top draft pick back in 2009. And I’m really curious how you see him profiling as a potential major league player both at the plate and in the field.

gg140084977_102FZ:  You don’t want to put too much pressure on players or give them too much credit before they’ve achieved the same level as the comp you’re using, but the guy that I think Grant Green could develop into is a Michael Young type player. I think he has that kind of profile. He’s really a gap-to-gap hitter who has 15-20 homer power. He just has a natural knack for hitting that makes you believe he could be a .300 hitter in the big leagues. And defensively, it’s been a little bit of a work in progress for him. But just like with Michael Young, Michael Young’s a guy who’s moved around and played a few different positions, and a lot of his value to the team was his ability to move around, not just within a season, but across seasons, and sort of fill in depending on where the team needed him. And I think Grant is kind of building up that sort of versatility, which I think could be a huge benefit to a team. So in a perfect world, you hope he turns into that Michael Young type of player.

AF:  Well, hopefully it’s a matter of turning a liability into a virtue if he develops this tremendous versatility then. But where do you see him as strongest in the field at this point?

FZ:  The best position that I’ve seen him play really is the position he’s playing right now, which is second base. I was joking with someone about this today saying, “He plays second base like he’s too good to play the position.” But I actually like that. He plays it with that kind of confidence, with a little bit of flair. But I like seeing him with that kind of confidence in the field. He can make all the plays at second base. When you play second base, you have just a little more time to get over to first, and that I think has relaxed him a little bit. He has good range, and I think he just has a comfort level at second base. I think he’s always had the defensive tools. Believe it or not, when we were scouting him in high school, we actually considered him a defense-first shortstop. So the defensive tools are certainly in there. And combine that with the confidence he’s shown playing second base and I think that’s where he profiles best.

AF:  That’s interesting. When I spoke with him last year, he said his preference was definitely to be playing right around the bag where the action is at either shortstop or second base. So the fact that he’s looking comfortable and showing confidence there at second base makes sense.

FZ:  Right, if he hits like Michael Young, you’ll find a place to play him. If you have a bat like that that has the ability to go to a few different spots and play those spots, that’s all the more valuable. You know, I was at the Sloan Sports Conference this weekend in Boston, and one of the papers was about the value of roster flexibility. And just as an aside, just for your own edification, it’s an academic paper but it’s on their website, I think it’s worth checking out. And they talk about the value of having a roster built on players who are fairly interchangeable and can play multiple positions, because they’re able to be platoon players, maybe even across different positions, and because it insulates you against injury. And that’s the direction that our roster has been going in the last couple of years. And I think we got a lot of benefit out of that last year, and I think we’ll get a lot of benefit out of it this year. And Grant could be the kind that fits in with that roster philosophy very well.

AF:  Yeah, I was going to say that theme certainly seems to fit right in with where you guys are at this point. It seemed like everything you did in the off-season was designed to add as much flexibility to the roster as you possibly could.

FZ:  Yeah, absolutely. When we’re looking at individual players, and we think they have that ability to expand their flexibility, we’re probably more inclined to at least take a look at that than we have in the past.

AF: That’s funny, it’s almost becoming like building a fantasy baseball roster. Guys who can play multiple positions are always one of the things you’re looking for.

DSC02384bFZ:  Yeah, there’s no doubt. Guys who can play across positions and save you a roster spot, obviously you have to figure out how much more valuable those guys are. And look, part of it is having a manager who can manage the personalities and keep guys happy. Every player wants to play everyday and wants to be at the same position everyday just because baseball players are creatures of habit. But Bob Melvin is just a great communicator and a guy that the players love to play for. And we have the advantage of being able to create a little bit more depth and flexibility and trust that he’ll be communicating with these guys so that the roster and all the guys are on the same page. And that’s a big part of being able to do this.

AF:  Yeah, it’s great to be able to have someone who can get guys to be happy about doing things they might not normally be all that happy to do!

FZ:  Right! I mean, it’s a challenge. There’s no guarantee that it’ll be smooth sailing, but there’s nobody I trust more than Bob Melvin with that task.

Be sure to check back tomorrow for Part 2 of A’s Farm’s exclusive interview with A’s director of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi, in which he gives us the lowdown on Miles Head, Daniel Robertson, Renato Nunez and Michael Ynoa and what he really looks for in minor league prospects!

A’s Major & Minor League Off-Season Transactions – Dec. 18 Update: A’s Find A Hiro To Play SS

Hiro

Hiro: Better than Godzilla?

Well, the biggest story to break for A’s fans in the weeks before the holidays was the news that A’s free agent shortstop Stephen Drew had agreed to a $9.5 million/1-year deal with the Red Sox, followed quickly by the news that Japanese shortstop Hiroyuki Nakajima had agreed to a $6.5 million/2-year deal (plus incentives and a $5.5 million 1-year option) with the A’s. The 30-year-old right-handed hitter has a career .310/.381/.474 slash line plus 104 home runs and 97 stolen bases over the last 6 seasons in Japan. His signing seems to settle the A’s starting shortstop question and makes arbitration-eligible Adam Rosales the likely backup at the position.

A’s free agent pitcher Brandon McCarthy also decided to leave the team for a $15.5 million/2-year deal with Arizona. It doesn’t look like the A’s are planning on signing a major league pitcher to replace McCarthy, but will instead count on a full season of availability from major-league ready RHP Dan Straily to make up for McCarthy’s loss.

On the minor league front, since our last update, the A’s traded RHP Graham Godfrey to the Red Sox as the player to be named in the deal to acquire RHP Sandy Rosario, who was later designated for assignment by the A’s and re-claimed by the Red Sox who then designated him for assignment again. So the A’s basically gave Godfrey to the Red Sox for the privilege of having Rosario on the roster for a few days. Minor league outfielder Jermaine Mitchell, who cleared waivers and elected free agency, ended up signing a minor league deal with the Phillies.

The most significant minor league addition the A’s made since our last update was the acquisition of 27-year-old minor league free agent catcher/first baseman Steven Hill, who’s played in 10 major league games for the Cardinals and spent most of last season at Triple-A Memphis, where he had a .266/.326/.488 slash line. The right-handed hitter figures to share the catching duties at Sacramento in 2013 with fellow minor league free agent signee Luke Montz.

You’ll find all new transactions since our last update noted below with italics and an asterisk. Any players who’ve recently been taking up space on the 40-man roster are listed below under Major League transactions, while all other players are listed under Minor League transactions. For all the minor league players, I’ve listed their primary positions as well as the level they spent the most time at in 2012. Just click on any player’s name to see their Baseball-Reference stats page…

 

MAJOR LEAGUE CHANGES

-Jonny Gomes OF / +Chris Young OF

-Pennington/Drew SS / +Hiroyuki Nakajima SS *

-Brandon Hicks IF / +Andy Parrino IF

-Brandon McCarthy RHP / +NONE *

-Jim Miller RHP / +Chris Resop RHP

-Tyson Ross RHP / +Andrew Werner LHP

 

Hiroyuki Nakajima

Hiroyuki Nakajima

+ MAJOR LEAGUE ADDITIONS

Chris Young OF (traded from AZ)

Hiroyuki Nakajima SS (signed from Japan) *

Andy Parrino IF (traded from SD)

Chris Resop RHP (traded from PITT)

Andrew Werner LHP (traded from SD)

 

- MAJOR LEAGUE SUBTRACTIONS

Jonny Gomes OF (FA signed with BOS)

Stephen Drew SS (FA signed with BOS) *

Cliff Pennington SS (traded to AZ)

Brandon Hicks IF (traded to NYM)

Brandon McCarthy RHP (FA signed with AZ) *

Jim Miller RHP (claimed by NYY)

Tyson Ross RHP (traded to SD)

 

Steven Hill

Steven Hill

+ MINOR LEAGUE ADDITIONS

Scott Moore 3B-1B AAA (minor league FA)

Luke Montz C-1B AAA (minor league FA)

Steven Hill C-1B AAA (minor league Rule 5 draftee) *

Tom Mendonca 3B AA (minor league rule 5 draftee) *

Darwin Perez SS-2B AA (minor league FA)

D’Arby Myers OF AA (minor league FA) *

Garrett Olson LHP AAA (minor league FA)

Justin Thomas LHP AAA (minor league FA)

Mike Ekstrom RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Kyler Newby RHP AA (minor league FA)

Yeiper Castillo RHP A (minor league FA) *

 

Jermaine Mitchell

Jermaine Mitchell

- MINOR LEAGUE SUBTRACTIONS

Kila Ka’aihue 1B AAA (minor league FA signed with AZ)

Jermaine Mitchell OF AAA (minor league FA signed with PHI) *

Blake Lalli C AAA (minor league FA signed with MIL)

Jason Jaramillo C AAA (minor league FA)

Wes Timmons IF AAA (minor league FA)

Matt Rizzotti 1B AA (minor league FA)

Leonardo Gil 3B AA (minor league FA)

A.J. Kirby-Jones 1B A (traded to SD)

Yordy Cabrera SS A (traded to MIA)

Michael Gilmartin SS-2B A (minor league Rule 5 draftee by CIN) *

Eliezer Mesa OF A (minor league Rule 5 draftee by DET) *

Graham Godfrey RHP AAA (traded to BOS) *

Rich Thompson RHP AAA (minor league FA signed with TOR) *

Jeremy Accardo RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Merkin Valdez RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Justin Souza RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Fabio Castro LHP AA (minor league FA)

Beau Jones LHP AA (minor league FA)

Matt McSwain RHP AA (minor league FA)

Jonathan Ortiz RHP AA (minor league FA)

Jose Guzman RHP AA (minor league FA)

Zach Thornton RHP A (traded to PITT)

 

Adam Rosales

Adam Rosales

RETURNING FREE AGENTS/ARB ELIGIBLES/OPTIONS

Daric Barton 1B (Arb Eligible Re-Signed)

Adam Rosales IF (Arb Eligible Re-Signed)

Pat Neshek RHP (Arb Eligible Re-Signed)

Bartolo Colon RHP (Free Agent Re-Signed)

Grant Balfour RHP (Option Renewed)

 

RETURNING ARB ELIGIBLES

Seth Smith OF (Arb Eligible)

Brandon Moss 1B (Arb Eligible)

George Kottaras C (Arb Eligible)

Jerry Blevins LHP (Arb Eligible)

Chris Resop RHP (Arb Eligible)

 

UNSIGNED MLB FREE AGENTS

Brandon Inge 3B (MLB Free Agent)

Dallas Braden LHP (MLB Free Agent)

Joey Devine RHP (MLB Free Agent)

 

COMING & GOING

Sandy Rosario RHP (traded from BOS – designated for assignment)

 

Be sure to like A’s Farm’s page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @AthleticsFarm to keep up with all the news down on the farm!

A’s Major & Minor League Off-Season Transactions – Dec. 1 Update

Jonny Gomes - All dressed up, with somewhere to go

Jonny Gomes: All dressed up, with somewhere to go.

With a flurry of activity on Friday just ahead of Major League Baseball’s non-tender deadline and with the Winter Meetings starting on Monday in Nashville, it seems like a good time to recap all the A’s major and minor league transactions from the end of the season through the non-tender deadline of November 30th. The most significant changes to affect the major league roster so far this off-season have been Jonny Gomes signing with Boston, the Chris Young/Cliff Pennington trade with Arizona, as well as the Tyson Ross trade with San Diego. These deals, along with a few other minor moves, have basically resulted in Chris Young replacing Jonny Gomes in the lineup and Chris Resop replacing Jim Miller in the bullpen, with Andy Parrino replacing Brandon Hicks and Andrew Werner replacing Tyson Ross as guys who’ll probably end up spending most of their time at Sacramento while filling in in Oakland as needed.

The biggest remaining question mark for the A’s is who will replace Cliff Pennington and Stephen Drew as the team’s starting shortstop in 2013. The two combined to start 129 games at shortstop for the A’s in 2012. Right now, with Pennington having been traded to Arizona and Drew a free agent, the position’s a bit of a black hole. But the assumption is that the A’s will either make a deal for a shortstop (possibly at the Winter Meetings), sign one on the free agent market (Marco Scutaro, Ronny Cedeno, Cesar Izturis, Jason Bartlett, Alex Gonzalez), or possibly even re-sign Drew if the market for him doesn’t end up getting too hot.

Of course, the team has already picked up closer Grant Balfour’s option, re-signed free agent right-hander Bartolo Colon, and re-signed arbitration eligible players Pat Neshek, Adam Rosales and Daric Barton. For those about to panic, don’t worry, Barton’s contract is not guaranteed, so he can be cut anytime and the A’s won’t owe him another dime. As of Friday night, there was no official word as to whether or not the team had offered contracts to their five remaining arbitration eligible players – outfielder Seth Smith, first baseman Brandon Moss, catcher George Kottaras, left-hander Jerry Blevins and recently-acquired right-hander Chris Resop – but the assumption is that no news is good news and the fact that we didn’t hear anything probably means that the A’s made offers to all these players and thus will retain the rights to them all.

Brandon McCarthy - To leave or not to leave, that is the question

Brandon McCarthy: To leave or not to leave, that is the question.

Of the team’s five remaining major league free agents, two – third baseman Brandon Inge and right-hander Joey Devine – can be expected to move on, while the jury is still out on the remaining three. As mentioned, shortstop Stephen Drew could return if he doesn’t find too many other tempting offers out there. There seems to be some mutual interest in a return engagement for Brandon McCarthy, but other teams are said to be sniffing around the right-hander as well. Oft-injured left-hander Dallas Braden is also on the market, and it’s possible that the northern California boy could sign an incentive-laden deal to stick around the old neighborhood.

As for the A’s minor league transactions, the most significant loss has probably been the signing of minor league free agent first baseman Kila Ka’aihue by Arizona. The most significant minor league addition by the A’s so far has probably been the signing of third baseman/first baseman Scott Moore who signed a minor-league contract with an invitation to spring training. The left-handed hitter made it into 72 games with the Astros in 2012, playing mainly at third base and first base, but he also got in some time at second base and in the outfield. The A’s are likely to make many more minor league signings as the off-season unfolds, though re-signing any of their own remaining minor league free agents is probably unlikely.

Any players who’ve recently been taking up space on the 40-man roster are listed below under Major League transactions, while all other players are listed under Minor League transactions. For all the minor league players, I’ve listed their primary positions as well as the level they spent the most time at in 2012. Just click on any player’s name to see their Baseball-Reference stats page…

 

Cliff Pennington

Cliff Pennington

MAJOR LEAGUE CHANGES

-Jonny Gomes OF / +Chris Young OF

-Cliff Pennington SS / +TBD SS

-Brandon Hicks IF / +Andy Parrino IF

-Jim Miller RHP / +Chris Resop RHP

-Tyson Ross RHP / +Andrew Werner LHP

 

Chris Young

Chris Young

+ MAJOR LEAGUE ADDITIONS

Chris Young OF (traded from AZ)

Andy Parrino IF (traded from SD)

Chris Resop RHP (traded from PITT)

Andrew Werner LHP (traded from SD)

 

- MAJOR LEAGUE SUBTRACTIONS

Jonny Gomes

Jonny Gomes

Jonny Gomes OF (FA signed with BOS)

Cliff Pennington SS (traded to AZ)

Brandon Hicks IF (traded to NYM)

Jim Miller RHP (claimed by NYY)

Tyson Ross RHP (traded to SD)

 

+ MINOR LEAGUE ADDITIONS

Scott Moore

Scott Moore

Scott Moore 3B-1B AAA (minor league FA)

Luke Montz C-1B AAA (minor league FA)

Darwin Perez SS-2B AA (minor league FA)

Garrett Olson LHP AAA (minor league FA)

Justin Thomas LHP AAA (minor league FA)

Mike Ekstrom RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Kyler Newby RHP AA (minor league FA)

 

- MINOR LEAGUE SUBTRACTIONS

Kila Ka'aihue

Kila Ka’aihue

Kila Ka’aihue 1B AAA (minor league FA signed with AZ)

Jermaine Mitchell OF AAA (minor league FA)

Wes Timmons IF AAA (minor league FA)

Jason Jaramillo C AAA (minor league FA)

Blake Lalli C AAA (minor league FA signed with MIL)

Matt Rizzotti 1B AA (minor league FA)

Leonardo Gil 3B AA (minor league FA)

A.J. Kirby-Jones 1B A (traded to SD)

Yordy Cabrera SS A (traded to MIA)

Yordy Cabrera

Yordy Cabrera

Jeremy Accardo RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Rich Thompson RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Merkin Valdez RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Justin Souza RHP AAA (minor league FA)

Fabio Castro LHP AA (minor league FA)

Beau Jones LHP AA (minor league FA)

Matt McSwain RHP AA (minor league FA)

Jonathan Ortiz RHP AA (minor league FA)

Jose Guzman RHP AA (minor league FA)

Zach Thornton RHP A (traded to PITT)

Grant Balfour

Grant Balfour

 

RETURNING FREE AGENTS/ARB ELIGIBLES/OPTIONS

Daric Barton 1B (Arb Eligible Re-Signed)

Adam Rosales IF (Arb Eligible Re-Signed)

Pat Neshek RHP (Arb Eligible Re-Signed)

Bartolo Colon RHP (Free Agent Re-Signed)

Grant Balfour RHP (Option Renewed)

 

Seth Smith

Seth Smith

LIKELY RETURNING ARB ELIGIBLES

Seth Smith OF (Arb Eligible)

Brandon Moss 1B (Arb Eligible)

George Kottaras C (Arb Eligible)

Jerry Blevins LHP (Arb Eligible)

Chris Resop RHP (Arb Eligible)

 

UNSIGNED MLB FREE AGENTS

Stephen Drew

Stephen Drew

Stephen Drew SS (MLB Free Agent)

Brandon Inge 3B (MLB Free Agent)

Brandon McCarthy RHP (MLB Free Agent)

Dallas Braden LHP (MLB Free Agent)

Joey Devine RHP (MLB Free Agent)

 

COMING & GOING

Sandy Rosario RHP (traded from BOS – designated for assignment)

 

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A’s grab Merkin, add mullet-man Schlichting and diminutive Dominican Republican Castro

Travis Schlichting shows off his Hall of Fame mullet (photo courtesy of Big League Stew)

The A’s have signed three minor league free agent pitchers, former Giants right-hander Merkin Valdez, former Dodgers right-hander Travis Schlichting, and former Phillies left-hander Fabio Castro, who measures in at an impressive 5’7”.

The diminutive Dominican Republican has a career ERA of 3.30 in 43 2/3 major league innings. Schlichting, best known for his Hall of Fame mullet, has a career ERA of 3.55 in 25 1/3 major league innings. And Merkin Valdez, best known for his unusual name, has a career ERA of 5.57 in 72 2/3 major league innings.

All three are expected to spend most of the 2012 season hanging out in the Sacramento bullpen, keeping one eye on the Rivercats’ starting pitchers and another eye on the latest additions to the A’s disabled list. The trio will likely be joined there by three other A’s minor league free agent signees, left-hander Erick Threets and right-handers Jim Miller and Edgar Gonzalez – all of whom are over 5’7” and none of whom are named “Merkin.”

Chico Escuela: The original diminutive Dominican Republican

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