Ray Fosse’s Take on this Spring’s Crop of Top Prospects

rfphoto153BNot only has Ray Fosse now spent three decades as a broadcaster for the Oakland A’s, working alongside names like Bill King, Lon Simmons, Ken Korach and Glen Kuiper, but he’s also a former All-Star catcher who won two World Series rings with the A’s in 1973 and 1974. We took the opportunity to get his take on the A’s current crop of prospects in the major league camp this spring…

AF:  So how do you feel about seeing this new crop of young prospects that have come into the A’s camp this spring?

RF:  I give credit to [scouting director] Eric Kubota and the scouting department – and making the trades, like Franklin Barreto coming from Toronto. Watching him play, he’s been outstanding. But I think the thing that Billy Beane and David Forst, who’s now the general manager, have never said is, “We’re not going to try to win.” And now, you’re hearing clubs are trying to tank it so they can get high draft choices. I’m saying, “Wait a minute, you’re supposed to be trying to win at this level. How do you tell your fans you’re trying to get draft choices?”

AF: What’s been your impression of what some of the younger guys like Franklin Barreto and Matt Chapman have been doing here in the big league camp this spring?

RF:  The main thing to look at with those kids is getting the experience at this level. I experienced it – I knew I was going to Triple-A, but I got a chance to be with the big league players. And that’s something that you can never put a price tag on. But I think Franklin Barreto – just watching him last weekend against the Cubs when the A’s scored three in the bottom of the ninth inning – he ended up getting a base hit to drive in the second run. Then he was on first and, on a base hit, he went to third on his own – first to third, and then scored on a sac fly and tied the game. Just watching, at 20, his development – as [A’s coach] Ron Washington said, “Maybe he knows he’s going to the minor leagues, but what he’s doing is experiencing this.” You can look at Matt Chapman, Franklin Barreto, Chad Pinder and Matt Olson – that’s a pretty good infield for the future. They’re probably all going to develop together and maybe come up together, depending on what happens at this level. But they’re getting experience facing major league pitching in spring training – something that’s invaluable.

AF:  Since you were a catcher, I wanted to ask if you’ve had a chance to see much of catcher Bruce Maxwell this spring and what your impression has been of him.

RF:  Yeah, I like him. And I think it’s a good position to be in, because there’s Stephen Vogt and Josh Phegley, and that’s it! I think what Bob Melvin and his staff are trying to figure out now is, in the event something happens, who’s going to come up. And Maxwell’s shown that he’s got a good idea. And whoever would come up…would be a back up, but it would be a great experience. So if I’m a catcher in the organization, I’m busting it and I’m learning as much as I can. When I signed with Cleveland many, many years ago, they were  looking for catchers because they didn’t have a lot in the organization. And it worked out, because I only spent two full years and two half years in the minor leagues and I was in the big leagues – and that’s signing out of high school as an 18-year-old. So it’s a great opportunity for a catcher. But I’ve enjoyed what Maxwell has done…just the way he seems to want to learn, the way he handles himself behind the plate. And we can never forget the most important job of a catcher is to catch – handle the pitching staff and catch. Offense is so prevalent at every position, but catching and handling the pitching staff are the keys to being a good catcher.

AF:  And since you were a catcher, you also know a little bit about pitchers. So I wanted to ask you what you’ve seen out of the A’s top pitching prospect, Sean Manaea, so far this spring.

RF:  I think the composure…Sean Manaea shows that confidence. Give credit to the A’s organization. The Royals were trying to win a World Series, which they did. And they were willing to give up someone like Manaea to get Ben Zobrist, who turned out great, but then he goes on to the Cubs. So they got him for a World Series…but the A’s were smart in picking up pitching – you can never have too much. And I think Sean Manaea, we may see him in Oakland sooner rather than later – a lot sooner than people think.

AF:  Well, it never hurts when you’re a big left-hander who throws hard, right?

RF:  Exactly. And again, showing the composure at this level. It is spring training, but you’re facing major league hitters. So I think that’s a big plus for him to be able to experience this but also to be able to show that he can pitch.

AF:  Thanks, Ray.

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